How Do Mushroom Farms Work?

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Image source: https://dced.pa.gov/paproudblog/did-you-know-pennsylvania-is-home-to-the-largest-grower-of-specialty-mushrooms/

By: Tomi Vacca, Journalist

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Image source: https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/shiitake-mushrooms
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Image source: https://www.liveeatlearn.com/oyster-mushrooms/

Mushrooms are not plants, and therefore cultivated differently than the run of the mill carrot or potato. Mushrooms require the right humidity levels, temperature, growing area, and inoculum. Inoculum is the method in which spores are spawned. If the spores aren’t properly inoculated and given proper inoculation conditions, it can lead to growth problems. The most common method of mushroom cultivation is done in small windowless buildings that allow the owners to tightly regulate temperature, humidity, and contaminants. Every spore cycle, more resources are added to the mushroom to allow the new crop to grow. Another method of mushroom farming is by using logs or man made logs made out of organic plant matter. Mushroom farming is a massive task of engineering. The temperature and humidity levels need to be closely regulated and they need to have a suitable location in which to grow and multiply.

 

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