Boeing Under Fire Due to 737 Max Issues

Boeing and the Lion Air Group today announced the airline purchased 50 of Boeing’s new 737 MAX 10 airplane, which will be the most fuel-efficient and profitable single-aisle jet in the aviation industry. This rendering shows the airplane in the carrier's livery. (Boeing illustration) (PRNewsfoto/Boeing)

Source: Boeing

Boeing and the Lion Air Group today announced the airline purchased 50 of Boeing’s new 737 MAX 10 airplane, which will be the most fuel-efficient and profitable single-aisle jet in the aviation industry. This rendering shows the airplane in the carrier’s livery. (Boeing illustration) (PRNewsfoto/Boeing)

A Boeing 737 Max, ‘Lion Air Flight 610’, crashed in the Java Sea a mere 12 minutes after takeoff, killing all 189 people on board.
During investigations that followed, an ‘Angle of Attack’ (AoA) sensor on board was targeted.

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A preliminary investigative report showed that a mechanic neglected the sensor in favor of other equipment. Additionally, the sensor had malfunctioned on Flight 610’s previous journey.

Another report released by crash investigators revealed that on both flights, pilots were unable to calculate basic figures such as altitude and velocity. Pilots on the fated flight seemed not to understand what was happening as they radioed air traffic controls, going only so far as to say they had ‘flight control problems.’

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Angle of Attack

The AoA sensor, which measures how far up or down the nose of the plane is pointed, bugged out on both flights. It incorrectly claimed the nose was pointed too high, and the plane was in danger of stalling and losing lift. Consequentially, the plane started automatically going into a dive to avoid a nonexistent stalling threat. Pilots on the first flight were able to shut down the motor moving the nose down. The pilots on the second flight were not so lucky, and the plane plunged nearly vertically down.

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Boeing’s latest model 737 model is being called back to avoid risks, while Boeing itself is closely investigating the cause of this accident.

This incident gives all engineers out there an important lesson: ‘Assess your product for all risks, especially if someone’s life depends on it.’ It also relates to the executive functions of sustained attention and working memory, showing the importance of keeping your head in desperate decision.

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-11-27/lion-air-pilots-struggle-detailed-in-preliminary-crash-report